Archive for the ‘Phantom Jettys’ Category

Thoughts, fears, and fantasies and the day-to-day realities of Crumb family life. Kominsky and Crumb met in 1972. Together, they have created a joint portrait of their lives, from the underground days of the Bay Area in the 70s to life in the south of France, where they moved permanently in 1991.

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Out of the late 70’s early southern California punk rock scene came the art of Raymond Pettibon. An artjourney at began with creating posters and album art and landed in galleries, museums and the homes of major art collectors. Pettibon’s comic-like drawings are full of disturbing, ironic or ambiguous text that sometimes gets violent and anti-authoritarian.

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I visited the New Museum in the Lower East Side on December 27, 2016 to see the Pipilotti Rist show Pixel Forest and then to Time Square’s Midnight Moment program in January to see Open My Glade (Flatten).

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Ai Weiwei returned to New York late last year in four separate galleries—Mary Boone (midtown and Chelsea), Lisson (also in Chelsea), and Deitch Projects (Soho). His project that focused on the refugee crisis.

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Francis Picabia (1879–1953), one of the leaders of the Dada movement has his first exhibition in the United States that follows his entire career.On view till March 19,2017.

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“The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) has taken a strong stand against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), a 1,134 ­mile long oil pipeline starting from the Bakken Oil Fields in North Dakota and ending up in refineries in Patoka, Illinois. It is proposed to transport over 570,000 barrels per day.

To date, more than 300 tribes and first nations officially stand with Standing Rock by way of tribal resolutions, letters of support, or tribal delegations joining the camp. There are entire cities and municipalities such as Santa Barbara, Seattle, and Minneapolis/St. Paul supporting them, and they aren’t the only ones. There are millions of people the world over standing in solidarity as well. 80,000 people in Ireland rallied recently to say #NoDAPL.

Dakota Access Pipeline would contribute to 50 million tonnes CO2 per year. This is­ the equivalent of 10 million cars or 15 coal plants. Every one of those tonnes of CO2 is a threat to all people on the planet. We can’t all breathe poison air.
The pipeline is a huge risk to prairie, farm lands and critical waterways as well, including the Missouri River. It is a massive pipeline that would transport crude oil. News report after news report continues to come out about oil spills across the continent. It’s never a matter of if the pipelines will leak and/or burst, it’s a matter of when. Energy Transfer Partners, the owner of Dakota Access LLC, is already responsible for over $9 million in property damage stemming from their dirty operations. Thousands of gallons have already been spilled. We don’t want to be the next statistic and we don’t want our children’s futures threatened by fossil fuels.

They’ve already desecrated burial sites of ancestors, effigies, and rock formations critical to the spiritual, emotional, and psychological well-being of our communities. None of that can ever be brought back. That’s why everyone is here in support, so that no more of these abuses continue and healing can happen. This pipeline is proposed to cross the Missouri River, less than one mile away from our community and less than 500 feet from our border. 18 million people downstream stand to be affected, too. This is Standing Rock’s fight but it’s not just a native issue.

We have a saying here in Standing Rock: Mni Wiconi. It means “water is life,” and it’s true. You can’t drink oil.” – Standing Rock Sioux

Laura Ortman and Raven Chacon performed and the benefit set up by Atomic Culture on October 17th at Casa Mezcal in New York, who along with all participants, stands in resistance with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to defend their sacred lands and water from the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

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STEFA and 75 Dollar Bill also performed.

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Senyawa – Rully Shabara & Wukir Suryadi – from Yogyakarta in Central Java come to New York for the first time to performed at Bridget Donahoe Gallery on August 10/ 2016 in a very warm space.